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Acai bowl

Are acai bowls healthy? Calories and nutrition

In recent years, acai bowls have become one of the most hyped-up health foods on the market. This article looks closely at the benefits and drawbacks of acai bowls to determine whether they’re healthy.

Evidence-based
This article is based on scientific evidence, written by experts, and fact-checked by experts.
We look at both sides of the argument and strive to be objective, unbiased, and honest.
Last updated on September 5, 2022, and last reviewed by an expert on August 10, 2022.

In recent years, acai bowls have become one of the most hyped-up health foods on the market.

They’re prepared from puréed acai berries — fruits grown in Central and South America — and served as a smoothie in a bowl or glass, topped with fruit, nuts, seeds, or granola.

Known for their vibrant color, creamy texture, and versatility, acai bowls are touted as an antioxidant-rich superfood. On the other hand, the dish can be high in calories and added sugar, and some claim it might do more harm than good to your health.

This article looks closely at the benefits and drawbacks of acai bowls to determine if they’re healthy.

Nutrition facts of an acai bowl

The nutrition profile of your acai bowl varies depending on the ingredients used.

Most bowls are high in fiber, antioxidants, and micronutrients like vitamin C, manganese, and potassium.

For reference, a 6-ounce (170-gram) acai bowl may contain the following nutrients:

However, commercial varieties often come in much larger portions and can contain up to 600 calories and 75 grams of sugar in a single serving, depending on which toppings you select.

In addition to acai berries, acai bowls often contain other fruits like strawberries, blueberries, and bananas.

These fruits are a great source of vitamin C and manganese, which act as antioxidants that protect your cells against oxidative damage caused by harmful compounds known as free radicals.

They’re also high in potassium, an essential nutrient that regulates blood pressure levels and protects against conditions like age-related bone loss and kidney stones.

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Summary: Though the nutrient profile varies depending on the ingredients used, most acai bowls are high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, manganese, and potassium.

Acai bowls are rich in antioxidants

Acai berries are high in antioxidants that help neutralize free radicals to prevent damage to your cells.

Test-tube studies show that acai berries are exceptionally high in plant compounds known as anthocyanins, including specific types like cyanidin 3-glucoside and cyanidin 3-rutinoside.

In one study, consuming acai pulp and applesauce increased levels of antioxidants in the blood in 12 healthy adults within 24 hours.

Human and animal studies suggest that acai berries could be linked to lower cholesterol levels, better brain function, and decreased colon cancer cell growth due to this antioxidant content.

Summary: Acai berries are high in antioxidants and have been associated with several health benefits in human and animal studies.

Acai bowls are high in sugar and calories

Acai bowls usually contain added toppings like fruits, nuts, seeds, and granola.

While these ingredients are nutritious, it’s easy to go overboard with your toppings and turn a healthy snack into a high-calorie indulgence.

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Furthermore, acai bowls purchased from stores and restaurants are often sold in large portions, sometimes containing two to three servings in a single bowl.

Eating more calories than you expend daily can increase weight gain.

What’s more, commercially prepared acai bowls are high in sugar. In addition to contributing to weight gain, consuming too much added sugar can promote the development of liver problems, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.

The most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting your daily added sugar intake to no more than 12 teaspoons for those following a 2,000-calorie diet, equal to about 48 grams of sugar.

Just one 6-ounce (170-gram) acai bowl packs in around 11 grams of added sugar, or about 23% of the total daily limit.

Summary: Acai bowls — especially those commercially prepared — are high in calories and sugar, which could contribute to weight gain and health issues like liver problems, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.

How to make acai bowls

One of the best ways to take advantage of acai bowls’ many potential health benefits is to make your own.

Start by blending unsweetened, frozen acai purée or acai powder with a bit of water or milk to make a base for your acai bowl.

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Next, add your choices of toppings, such as sliced fruit, cacao nibs, or coconut flakes. Plus, consider adding your favorite nuts, seeds, or butter to boost your bowl’s protein content, keeping you feeling fuller for longer.

Keep your toppings in moderation and limit high-calorie choices if you want to lose weight.

You can also try blending greens like kale or spinach into the base of your acai bowl to increase its nutritional value.

Finally, remember to monitor your portion sizes to keep your intake of sugar, carbs, and calories under control.

Summary: Making your own acai bowl at home can maximize potential health benefits. Be sure to keep your toppings in moderation and monitor your portion sizes.

Summary

Acai bowls are made from acai berries and often additional fruits, then topped with ingredients like fruit, nuts, seeds, and granola.

Though they’re nutrient dense and rich in antioxidants, commercial varieties are often sold in large portions and may be high in added sugar and calories.

Making your own acai bowl at home can help you moderate your portion sizes and is a great way to control what you’re putting on your plate.

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